Graham Philip


Tell el-Dab'a XV

Metalwork and Metalworking Evidence of the Late Middle Kingdom and the Second Intermediate Period



ISBN 978-3-7001-3664-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3855-6
Online Edition
Untersuchungen der Zweigstelle Kairo des Österreichischen Archäologischen Instituts 26 
Denkschriften der Gesamtakademie  36 
2006  (ISBN-13: 978-3-7001-3664-4), 252 Seiten, 30,5x23,5cm, broschiert
€  131,50   

Graham Philip
ist „Senior Lecturer“ an der Universität Durham

The collection of metal artefacts from Tell el-Dab'a of the eastern Nile Delta, dating to the first half of the 2nd millennium BC, is probably the richest, best-documented find of the eastern Mediterranean that has been published to date. The material will provide new insights into various dimensions of past societies of this region. A brief introduction to the site begins the volume, followed by a fully illustrated catalogue of the findings – an extensive range of copper-alloy artefacts and smaller numbers of silver and gold objects. Next, the various artefact classes are discussed in terms of their wider typological parallels, chronology and distribution, thus permitting the material from the Delta to be viewed in terms of the wider Egyptian and Levantine equivalents. From this comparison it is clear that the bulk of the material is of west Asian inspiration, derived from styles first seen in north-west Syria in the last centuries of the 3rd millennium BC. The extensive range of metalworking debris from the site, including limestone and steatite moulds, crucibles, copper ingots and tuyeres, is treated in detail, and the relationship between the artefacts for which there is evidence of on-site production and the finds in general is discussed. The volume also reports on the chemical analysis of a wide range of copper and silver artefacts from the site, and considers the correlation, in some cases surprising, between composition and typology. Contextual analysis of grave findings clarifies links between artefact types and the age and sex of the buried individuals, sets of artefacts, and patterns in the positioning of artefacts within graves; changes through time can also be seen. Thus it is possible to investigate the similarities and contrasts between burial practices in Tell el-Dab'a and contemporary practices in the Levant and the Nile Valley. Despite the "hybrid" material culture of the Delta society, it is argued that mortuary practices, at least for the elite, drew heavily on aspects of west Asian ideology. This leads to a discussion of the connection between the symbolic role of metalwork and the expression of status, and a consideration of the possible social and political implications of changing stylistic zones within the east Mediterranean basin during the earlier 2nd millennium

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 9050, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at

BC. Also reviewed is the manner in which specific elements of material culture were influenced by the development and flourishing of a distinctive Nile Delta elite identity.

Bestellung/Order


Tell el-Dab'a XV


ISBN 978-3-7001-3664-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3855-6
Online Edition


Send or fax to your local bookseller or to:

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2,
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 905-0 Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at
UID-Nr.: ATU 16251605, FN 71839x Handelsgericht Wien, DVR: 0096385

Bitte senden Sie mir
Please send me
 
Exemplar(e) der genannten Publikation
copy(ies) of the publication overleaf


NAME


ADRESSE / ADDRESS


ORT / CITY


LAND / COUNTRY


ZAHLUNGSMETHODE / METHOD OF PAYMENT
    Visa     Euro / Master     American Express


NUMMER

Ablaufdatum / Expiry date:                      

    I will send a cheque           Vorausrechnung / Send me a proforma invoice
 
DATUM, UNTERSCHRIFT / DATE, SIGNATURE

BANK AUSTRIA CREDITANSTALT, WIEN (IBAN AT04 1100 0006 2280 0100, BIC BKAUATWW, BLZ 11000), KONTO-NR. 00622 800 100, BAWAG/ÖSTERREICHISCHE POSTSPARKASSE, WIEN (IBAN AT976000000002365011, BIC OPSKATWW, BLZ 60000) KONTO-NR. 2365.011, DEUTSCHE BANK MÜNCHEN (IBAN DE16 7007 0024 0238 8270 00, BIC DEUTDEDBMUC, BLZ 70070024), KONTO-NR. 2388270
  Online Edition   Table of Contents 
Graham Philip


Tell el-Dab'a XV

Metalwork and Metalworking Evidence of the Late Middle Kingdom and the Second Intermediate Period



ISBN 978-3-7001-3664-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3855-6
Online Edition
Untersuchungen der Zweigstelle Kairo des Österreichischen Archäologischen Instituts 26 
Denkschriften der Gesamtakademie  36 
2006  (ISBN-13: 978-3-7001-3664-4), 252 Seiten, 30,5x23,5cm, broschiert
€  131,50   

Graham Philip
ist „Senior Lecturer“ an der Universität Durham

The collection of metal artefacts from Tell el-Dab'a of the eastern Nile Delta, dating to the first half of the 2nd millennium BC, is probably the richest, best-documented find of the eastern Mediterranean that has been published to date. The material will provide new insights into various dimensions of past societies of this region. A brief introduction to the site begins the volume, followed by a fully illustrated catalogue of the findings – an extensive range of copper-alloy artefacts and smaller numbers of silver and gold objects. Next, the various artefact classes are discussed in terms of their wider typological parallels, chronology and distribution, thus permitting the material from the Delta to be viewed in terms of the wider Egyptian and Levantine equivalents. From this comparison it is clear that the bulk of the material is of west Asian inspiration, derived from styles first seen in north-west Syria in the last centuries of the 3rd millennium BC. The extensive range of metalworking debris from the site, including limestone and steatite moulds, crucibles, copper ingots and tuyeres, is treated in detail, and the relationship between the artefacts for which there is evidence of on-site production and the finds in general is discussed. The volume also reports on the chemical analysis of a wide range of copper and silver artefacts from the site, and considers the correlation, in some cases surprising, between composition and typology. Contextual analysis of grave findings clarifies links between artefact types and the age and sex of the buried individuals, sets of artefacts, and patterns in the positioning of artefacts within graves; changes through time can also be seen. Thus it is possible to investigate the similarities and contrasts between burial practices in Tell el-Dab'a and contemporary practices in the Levant and the Nile Valley. Despite the "hybrid" material culture of the Delta society, it is argued that mortuary practices, at least for the elite, drew heavily on aspects of west Asian ideology. This leads to a discussion of the connection between the symbolic role of metalwork and the expression of status, and a consideration of the possible social and political implications of changing stylistic zones within the east Mediterranean basin during the earlier 2nd millennium

BC. Also reviewed is the manner in which specific elements of material culture were influenced by the development and flourishing of a distinctive Nile Delta elite identity.

In den Medien: 
  • Bibliotheca Orientalis LXV, Nr. 3-4, 2008


Inhaltsverzeichnisse und Leseproben sind frei zugänglich. Tables of Contents and Reading examples are freely accessible.
Vergessen Sie nicht das Login am Server, wenn Sie auf Kapitel zugreifen wollen, die nicht allgemein zugänglich sind.
Links zu diesen Dokumenten werden erst nach dem Login sichtbar.
Do not forget to Login on the server if you want to access chapters that are not freely accessible.
Links to these documents will only be visible after logon.

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 9050, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at