Vienna Institute of Demography (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015

Special issue on Demographic differential vulnerability to climate-related disasters

ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8007-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8041-8
Online Edition
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 
2016,  300 Seiten, 24x17cm, broschiert
€  60,–   
Open access


Refereed Articles

Differential mortality from extreme climate events

Differential mortality patterns from hydro-meteorological disasters: Evidence from cause-of-death data by age and sex (Emilio Zagheni, Raya Muttarak, Erich Striessnig)

Daily mortality changes in Taiwan in the 1970s: An examination of the relationship between temperature and mortality (Zhongwei Zhao, Yuan Zhu and Edward Jow-Ching Tu)

Spatial patterns of social vulnerability to weather and climate extremes

Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines (J. Andres F. Ignacio, Grace T. Cruz, Fernando Nardi and Sabine Henry)

Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai (Alex de Sherbinin and Guillem Bardy)

Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand (Jacqueline Meijer-Irons)

Who is concerned about and takes action on climate change? Gender and education divides among Thais (Raya Muttarak and Thanyaporn Chankrajang)

Forecasting future societies vulnerability and adaptive capacity through the lens of human capital

Future differential vulnerability to natural disasters by level of education (Erich Striessnig and Elke Loichinger)

The demography of human development and climate change vulnerability: A projection exercise (Jesus Crespo Cuaresma and Wolfgang Lutz)

A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand (Elke Loichinger, Samir KC and Wolfgang Lutz)

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Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
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https://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at

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Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015
ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8007-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8041-8
Online Edition



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doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2015s71




Thema: journals
Vienna Institute of Demography (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015

Special issue on Demographic differential vulnerability to climate-related disasters

ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8007-4
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-8041-8
Online Edition
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 
2016,  300 Seiten, 24x17cm, broschiert
€  60,–   
Open access

Zhongwei Zhao, Yuan Zhu, Edward Jow-Chung Tu
S.  71 - 90
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2015s71
Abstract:
Growing evidence indicates that world temperatures have increased in recent history, and that this trend is likely to continue in the future. The rise in global temperatures has been accompanied by an increase in extreme weather events, which often have devastating environmental, economic, demographic, and social effects. As concern about the impact of climate change has grown in recent years, there has been a considerable increase in the number of studies published on the effects of extreme temperatures. However, detailed, systematic, and historical investigations into the relationship between temperature and mortality relationship are still difficult to find. This study fills some of these gaps. By examining the impact of extreme temperatures on mortality in Taiwan in the 1970s, our aim is to answer the following questions: (1) Is a lower or a higher temperature recorded in winter or summer related to higher daily mortality? (2) Is mortality higher in particular years with extreme temperatures than it is in the corresponding periods of other years with normal temperatures? (3) Finally, if more extreme temperatures are indeed associated with higher mortality, what kinds of people tend to face higher mortality risks? This study shows that variations in daily mortality were related to changes in temperature in Taiwan over the study period. Cold temperatures in the winter, hot temperatures in the summer, and unusually cold or hot temperatures were all associated with higher mortality. In comparison with other times of the year, the proportions of people who died at old or very young ages were relatively high during cold periods. The proportions of deaths caused by cardiovascular diseases were also relatively high, and these deaths contributed to the high mortality levels in winter time. Meanwhile, during the hot periods relatively high proportions of children and young people died of injuries or poisoning, and relatively high proportions of people died of respiratory diseases; both of these causes of death were closely related to mortality increases in the summer. In comparison with recent decades, however, these patterns were more observable in the 1970s, when the public health and the socioeconomic development levels in Taiwan were not as advanced as they are today.

Published Online:  2016/09/20 19:31:49
Object Identifier:  0xc1aa500e 0x00344f4d

Refereed Articles

Differential mortality from extreme climate events

Differential mortality patterns from hydro-meteorological disasters: Evidence from cause-of-death data by age and sex (Emilio Zagheni, Raya Muttarak, Erich Striessnig)

Daily mortality changes in Taiwan in the 1970s: An examination of the relationship between temperature and mortality (Zhongwei Zhao, Yuan Zhu and Edward Jow-Ching Tu)

Spatial patterns of social vulnerability to weather and climate extremes

Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines (J. Andres F. Ignacio, Grace T. Cruz, Fernando Nardi and Sabine Henry)

Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai (Alex de Sherbinin and Guillem Bardy)

Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand (Jacqueline Meijer-Irons)

Who is concerned about and takes action on climate change? Gender and education divides among Thais (Raya Muttarak and Thanyaporn Chankrajang)

Forecasting future societies vulnerability and adaptive capacity through the lens of human capital

Future differential vulnerability to natural disasters by level of education (Erich Striessnig and Elke Loichinger)

The demography of human development and climate change vulnerability: A projection exercise (Jesus Crespo Cuaresma and Wolfgang Lutz)

A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand (Elke Loichinger, Samir KC and Wolfgang Lutz)



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Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
https://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at